An Obligatory Post in Response to the Legalization of Gay Marriage

I spent quite some time this morning working on my last blog post, and the moment I shared it on Facebook¬†I noticed something else in my newsfeed. There was¬†#MarriageEquality, and within moments the message was¬†clear: after all this time and to absolutely no one’s surprise, the United States Supreme Court ruled that gay marriage is a Constitutional right and¬†is therefore legal in all 50 states.¬†My immediate response: “Darn, I just finished a big blog post and now I have to write another today!”

On a more serious note, this is a pretty big event. June 26, 2015¬†will definitely be in the history books.¬†Already there have been tons of¬†extreme reactions on both sides of the main aisles. And of course this issue¬†has occupied my thoughts for most of the day, even though I’m not worked up over it. I don’t have a major theme¬†for my response. So here are my miscellaneous thoughts on the national legalization of gay marriage.

First, this¬†battle was lost years ago. Nothing that new is happening. Public opinion has been moving steadily for decades towards acceptance of homosexual relationships as equal to heterosexual ones. More than that, the idea of gay marriage works perfectly¬†as part of the conception of marriage in the modern world. The West started¬†a very long time ago moving marriage from the sphere of commitment, responsibility,¬†reproduction, social stabilization, etc. to the sphere of “twue wuv” and personal fulfillment. Once that became the dominant paradigm, which happened well before I was even born,¬†gay marriage was a natural and reasonable outcome. To undo the damage, we would have to completely reformulate society’s understanding of what marriage is all about and for. Maybe that will happen, but politics won’t be enough¬†and such a worldview change¬†will take¬†generations.

Next, real marriage is still untouched by¬†legal fictions. If marriage is, as I believe, something with a distinct nature and a specific ontological shape, then it exists before and apart from any legal¬†recognitions. This means that the government may be redefining “marriage” for legal purposes and¬†as an example to society, but it still can’t change the leopard’s spots. The new legal unions between gay couples may be called “marriage” by our society, but that doesn’t¬†make them in any way a real marriage. This means God, too, is unhurt.¬†He will only recognize the marriage covenant as He pleases, whatever government may say.

As well, nothing has changed in our nation to¬†invite God’s judgment.¬†This legal¬†decree is just the latest symptom of existing¬†moral faults in society and government. Those are what fall under God’s “No,” not the enactment of a policy most of the nation was already in agreement with. If¬†God at all intends to bring America down, it will be on the basis of many preexisting¬†faults which led to this act. There is nothing new happening in the Supreme Court decision to affect God’s response to us for better or for worse.

For these reasons and more,¬†Christians don’t need to panic or¬†decry the end of the world. The truth is that, as I mentioned,¬†America has been on this path for some time, so panic now isn’t necessary. Moreover, God’s purposes and the Church have survived far worse.¬†The Church in Germany made it through Nazism. When the first Christians burst onto the scene of the Roman world, their society was even worse than ours was. Yet just in that place God turned the world upside down and Jesus was proclaimed everywhere with great results. Even the atrocious conflicts between Catholics and the Reformers,¬†an evil which grew up within the Church, did not spell the end for God’s people. For God is faithful, and the gates of Hell will not prevail over those who share the Spirit which raised Jesus from the dead.

What Christians must do is prepare to address the new challenges for¬†the Church.¬†First and simply, we must¬†prepare¬†for churches and any Christian organizations to lose their tax-exempt status. That’s very likely at this point. Moreover, it’s not inconceivable that Christian colleges could lose accreditation from federally recognized agencies. Christians¬†in many occupations, if they have any voice, may find themselves fired, suspended, or penalized in pay for opposing gay marriage. But most of that isn’t what I want to focus on. After all, if Jesus is Lord and the government is not we should expect such things. What concerns me far more is the challenge coming to the Church from within.¬†For years there have been people within Christianity arguing that¬†homosexuality isn’t actually condemned in Scripture. Some of them have decent arguments and are serious scholars.¬†Voices¬†for this belief will only grow louder now that gay marriage is a fact of American existence. This means that Christians will have to deal with people within the Church disagreeing on this issue moreso than ever before. Many of these people even have a genuine belief in the authority of Scripture and are convinced that this position is Biblically faithful. How should we handle that? Will we excommunicate them? Will we ordain them or not? Can they serve as deacons? Must we treat them all as unbelievers? To what extent should we feel the need to respond to their arguments, and how do we decide if they are “too wrong” on this matter of Biblical interpretation?¬†We will find this issue confronting most congregations, even the¬†more conservative ones. We¬†need to be preparing answers now.

It is more important than ever for¬†believers holding to the traditional view to live quiet and respectable lives full of grace. We are now, more than we even were before, on the “wrong side of history” in the eyes of most of society.¬†As we go on, it’s probably time to focus on¬†living peaceable and upright lives. If we are modest, reserved, and blameless, we cannot be faulted on character charges. If we are quiet¬†(not silent!) respectful, we will earn a better hearing. But more than anything, if we show radical, unconditional love to all people as we try to live these unassuming lives, our actions will speak the loudest. We must¬†in every way defy the stereotypes of people who believe in traditional Scriptural marriage by being too approachable and¬†easy to get along with for anyone to¬†get away with calling us “bigots” or accusing us of hate.

There’s probably other stuff I might say, but I can’t¬†remember anything else right now. Nonetheless, I think these points are enough for¬†today. We’re dealing with a major¬†change, and¬†who knows what all will happen but God? So these are my 2 cents. Feel free to spend them as you wish.

I'm 22. I'm married with a toddler and a newborn. love Jesus Christ. I grew up a Southern Baptist and now situate myself within Evangelical Calvinism (which isn't TULIP!). I also draw substantially from N. T. Wright, Peter Leithart, and Alastair Roberts. I go to the Baptist College of Florida. I'm also a bit nerdy.