Don’t Forget that Celibacy Is an Option

As many of you know, I’m in college right now. I’m also happily married. In fact, I can’t imagine doing my adult life single. Several other young couples seem to feel the same way, and I pray God blesses them. Marriage truly is a wonderful gift, and a powerful sign of the relationship between Christ and His Church.¬†That said, I’m¬†concerned with the relentless promotions and endorsements (even some of the prayers) for¬†marriage I see given to my fellow students. As great as marriage is,¬†it’s not the only lifestyle available to Christians. Our Lord Jesus Himself did not go that route, but another.¬†Celibacy is also an option.

Both Jesus and Paul exemplified the celibate call, devoting their entire lives to a sacred mission for God rather than taking on the earthly entanglements1 of marriage. This is not to say, of course, that marriage is at all a bad thing. Indeed, it is rather a very good and natural part of the original creation.2 It remains the bedrock of healthy society and plays an important role in the life of the Church. There are few more potent images of the union which Christ enters into with His Church than the union of man and woman.3

Nonetheless, marriage is at its heart part of this age, the world that is passing away.4 Practically speaking, it was needed to fill the earth with people who could reflect the image of God in worship and service.5 This purpose is expiring in the new creation, which has already begun breaking into the world through Christ’s resurrection and the outpouring of His Spirit upon His Body at Pentecost. The new world is ever present before us as we wait for the return of Jesus, and when He does return marriage will be finished.6

In addition to all of this, marriage is, well, quite a task. I’m not complaining; I love it! Nonetheless, it takes up a great deal of time and effort, time and effort which could be spent by the single person doing a wide variety of other things for the kingdom of God.7 There are serious practical differences in serving God with a family and without one. While of course a married person¬†can serve God passionately and effectively (that is my goal, after all!), the single person can do so with greater¬†flexibility, freedom,¬†simplicity, and even risk. I will¬†never be able to drop everything and risk my life or even just my livelihood for missional and ministry purposes the same way that, say, the Apostle Paul could.

So what I do I aim to say? To all of you unmarried college students and youngsters out there, especially my co-learners at the Bridal Baptist College of Florida, don’t assume that marriage is, must be, or should be in your future. There is an alternative, indeed a radically countercultural (even for Christian culture) one. You can not marry, and you can¬†not have sex.¬†Everyone in our culture outside the Church¬†expects you to be regularly sexually active, either within marriage or without. Sex is in fact almost given¬†god-like honors. “You must not repress your sexuality,” you are told. That would be a sacrilege¬†against the rite of sexual self-expression and satisfaction. It’s¬†unhealthy¬†(ritually unclean?) and¬†prudish/ignorant (heretical?) to deny yourself such pleasures. Even within many¬†Christian circles, these basic tenants are often (at least subconsciously) accepted, only with the caveat that the right place for all of this sexual expression is marriage.¬†A commitment to lifelong celibacy amounts to a polemic, if not a declaration of war, against corrupted¬†modern sexual ethos.

In addition to this, a commitment to celibacy functions as a powerful eschatological sign to the world. Marriage, as I noted before, is proper to the old creation, and will pass away. To commit to celibacy in the present stands, then, as an anticipation and symbol of the future state. In cultures with particularly strong family ties, where getting married and having children can affect all sorts of relationships, social status, fortunes, reputation, or property rights, celibacy serves to declare trust in God rather than these temporary systems. Refusing to marry or engage in sexual activity in the present is a way of showing the world that you are part of a different world, the age to come, in which reproduction is by the power of the Spirit rather than by man, satisfaction is found in union with Christ rather than sexual union, and the family that truly matters is the family born of God, brothers and sisters of Christ, rather than the family born naturally.

In today’s culture, though, celibacy is essentially seen as a death sentence, at least¬†for our social/relational selves.¬†The fear goes that a celibate person is missing out on what makes life count, on true love and intimate¬†personal relations. Yet Christ declares an alternative. He promises and creates a new family, a new web of relationships, in His Church.8 I wrote on this in a previous post, and¬†it matters for the question of celibacy. Lifelong celibacy may rule out relationships of¬†sexual-romantic and paternal/maternal love, but those¬†are¬†not the only¬†kind of relationship which¬†be fulfilling and¬†truly loving. When we come together as Christ’s body, allowing Him to reform our hearts, minds,¬†affections, and interests by His Spirit, then we can more than make up for this lack, supporting those who would commit to celibacy. This is a high calling for¬†those of us who are Church family,¬†demanding that we be genuinely interested in and compassionate towards each other, but¬†for those of us who follow Christ, what else do we expect?

So, then, I simply ask you all, actually and personally as my fellow youngsters, to seriously consider this. You BCF people, I know they call it the Bridal College of Florida. But there are very few other lifestyles in our culture which can have the same power as committed celibacy, especially in this post-Obergefell world. It is a sign of Christ and His kingdom, comes highly recommended in Christian history, and I honestly believe can and will change your life, if you are willing to take the plunge.

(P.S. I know it may seem odd that I write so encouragingly of celibacy when I myself am married. Yet I need to be, and I know it. I’ve known for a very long time that God designed me specifically to¬†marry. I couldn’t do life any other way. Not everyone is like that. Many people are not. And it concerns me that this valuable and powerful Christian lifestyle is so neglected and marginalized today.)

(P.P.S. I’ve written on this once before, and my friend Clark also wrote on it as a guest writer.)

(P.P.P.S. Speaking of guest writing, if anyone wants to guest write here you can/should hit me up [email protected])

  1. 1 Corinthians 7:33
  2. Genesis 1:27, 31; Matthew 19:4-5
  3. Ephesians 5:22-33
  4. 1 Corinthians 7:29, 31
  5. Genesis 1:26-30
  6.  Matthew 22:30
  7. 1 Corinthians 7:32-35
  8. Matthew 19:27-29, Mark 10:28-30
I'm 22. I'm married with a toddler and a newborn. love Jesus Christ. I grew up a Southern Baptist and now situate myself within Evangelical Calvinism (which isn't TULIP!). I also draw substantially from N. T. Wright, Peter Leithart, and Alastair Roberts. I go to the Baptist College of Florida. I'm also a bit nerdy.