In Christ, Out of Christ? Against Eternal Security, from a Union with Christ Perspective

[For the first of my two “union with Christ”-focused eternal security essays, I will argue that salvation can be lost. In the next post I will argue that it cannot, and leave you readers to judge.]

Against Eternal Security: Union with Christ, Tended by the Father

“You have fallen away from grace!”1¬†declared Paul to the Galatians who followed the Judaizers.¬†There are many more statements like this one, and warnings along the same lines, in the New Testament. Paul, the author of Hebrews, John, and even Jesus all make¬†similar remarks. Taken at face value, they¬†seem to teach that one you are in God’s grace, a state most would call “saved,” there is still a possibility that you can¬†walk¬†(or perhaps, as in the Galatians’¬†case, fall) away. This essay will argue that the face value, one might say “literal,” reading is correct. In particular, three points must be made: that salvation is Christ’s possession alone in which believers share by spiritual union, that this union is maintained at the discretion of the Father and may be cut off¬†in His judgment, and that these two factors nonetheless allow for a believer to be secure in his place and encourage a godly lifestyle. This whole¬†appears to be the clear teaching of Scripture. The Biblical nature of this model is clear from the first point, that¬†“Salvation belongs to the Lord.”2

That salvation is first and foremost the possession of Jesus Himself rather than that of individual believers is key to understanding why people can¬†forfeit grace.¬†Christians do not “have” salvation like one “has” a car. Rather, if the car analogy is continued, Christians share in salvation much like a child shares in the use of his parents’ vehicles.¬†This continued sharing is sustained by union with Christ through His Spirit.¬†Many lines of Biblical evidence support this view.¬†In Revelation, the saints cry out that “salvation belongs to our God!”3 The apostle John defines eternal life not as something Christians get, but as the Lord Jesus Himself and knowing Him.4 Paul likewise¬†explains that God¬†gives eternal life as a gift which is located¬†“in Christ Jesus our Lord,”5 and that there is no condemnation specifically for people who are “in Christ Jesus.”6¬†Believers are not sons of God in and of themselves, but by virtue of their union with Christ.7 This “in Christ” language is not mere¬†fluff, decoration designed to remind the reader that Jesus¬†saves. Rather, to say people are saved in Christ is to say that their salvation is altogether¬†experienced through personal union with Him, who Himself is “wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption.”8¬†None should forget: what¬†a person has by sharing with the owner, he may lose if he ruins the relationship.

If salvation is enjoyed exclusively as Christ’s possession by union with Him, then¬†the possibility presents itself that one could lose what is not¬†properly his own.¬†There is evidence in Scripture that this can and indeed does happen at the discretion of the Father. The primary evidence for this can be found John 15. Jesus says that He is the Vine, and His Father is the Gardener. The Gardener removes every branch in Him which does not bear fruit.9 These removed branches are thrown into the fire and burned up.10 While various attempts have been made to argue that Jesus is speaking here of¬†people who only appear to be united to Him, or perhaps are only united to Him “externally” through the “visible church,” nothing in the passage indicates this, and such an interpretation smacks of eisegesis. Jesus commands His disciples to remain in Him, quite directly implying that¬†they might not do so, instead to¬†be pruned by the Father. The¬†most straightforward reading of the text is¬†as follows: people who believe in Christ are united to Him like branches on a vine. If they do not remain in Him (presumably through faith), and thus they do¬†not produce fruit, and the Father will cut them off and cast them into fire. Outside of this text, there is other evidence that judgment awaits those who once believed in Christ but depart from the faith.11 While people often argue that this temporary faith is not a “true” faith, a “saving” faith, this seems to be a cop-out. Of course faith without works is dead,12 but this does not imply that people who live active Christian lives for years¬†before apostatizing (of whom there are very many) never had real faith. All of this evidence, on the other hand, makes straightforward sense if union with Christ through faith is the controlling concept. Those who trust in Christ are¬†in Christ and enjoy salvation so long as they believe, but if they lose faith, if they stop trusting and abiding in Jesus, they are cut off from the only source of salvation.

None of this is to say that there is no security for the believer, or that his salvation becomes dependent upon himself. That would contradict the entire first point of this argument, that salvation is of Christ from first to last, and is entirely His work and possession. As mentioned earlier, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.”13 Jesus will never cast out anyone who comes to Him.14 God promises to work in His children¬†and sanctify them¬†continually until the day of¬†Christ.[Philippians 1:9] Yet the error of one-sidedness must be avoided. The Lord may be faithful, and He will not break His promises¬†to those who are in Christ, but there is no promise that everyone who is in Christ will automatically remain in Christ.¬†Even though¬†the faith through¬†which one is united to Christ¬†is¬†a¬†gift from God,15 faith¬†is a gift which can wither away¬†through neglect and disobedience, leading to judgment.16 This is not a works-salvation, requiring continued obedience to stay justified before God. Rather, this is union-with-Christ-salvation, which requires¬†only that the union not be broken through¬†abandonment. For those who¬†believe but wish to believe more,17 there is¬†always grace.¬†Whoever trusts in Christ, and only ever comes to Him alone¬†in faith seeking His acceptance,¬†he will find rest and security. This could even be called a kind of “eternal security:” everyone who is united to Christ through faith can be assured that his eternity is secure¬†in Christ.¬†Yet no one should think that he¬†will enjoy¬†permanent blessings if he stops trusting in the Son who is Himself eternal life. The Father loves the Son too much to allow¬†such an offense to go unchallenged.

The conclusion, then, is not difficult to follow. Salvation is enjoyed¬†by union with Christ, but union with Christ is through faith, and¬†if faith departs the salvation in Christ is no longer accessible. Yet from the position of being in Christ, salvation is fully secure, as¬†Jesus has full possession of it. Each of these points makes sense¬†both from what Scripture says and what¬†is theologically consistent. The doctrine of eternal security must deny the¬†Father’s pruning of the¬†faith-less branches, or change the vine from¬†Jesus Himself into¬†a visible representation of Him (e.g. the¬†outward church), or redefine the nature of the relationship between vine and branch.¬†Yet Christ is the true Vine, all who¬†trust in Him, even for a time, are His true branches, and those who cease to believe in Him are cast into the fire, just as the Scriptures teach.

Brief Response for Eternal Security

Naturally, being myself the writer of this essay, I think it makes sense and the points are fairly good.¬†But I can represent both sides easily, so from the other side I have a few criticisms. First off, the “take the Bible at face value” setup in the beginning is, as almost always, unnecessary. Proponents of eternal security will only take¬†the¬†verses used here as¬†something besides¬†face value because they¬†want to take certain other verses at face value (e.g. Romans 8:28-39).

This essay also seems to neglect the role of the new birth¬†which occurs when people are first united to Christ. While one can easily grant that salvation is exclusively Jesus’ own possession, in which we share simply by faith,¬†is it unreasonable to¬†think that, once united to Jesus and born again, certain permanent changes occur which¬†prevent falling away? The Apostle John, cited so much in this essay, seems to give that impression throughout¬†his first epistle. Likewise, John 6, which is also cited here at one point, seems to state quite strongly that¬†those who come to Christ will certainly be raised at the last day, unless an alternative interpretation can be set forth (which, if possible, is at least not attempted in this essay).

It should also be noted that on both sides, we agree that unfaithful people, even if they used to act like good Christians, will not be saved. Yet is it really as implausible as this essay dismissively states that those who fall away like this were never really united to Christ to begin with? There is some Biblical reason to think so (1 Jn. 2:19, 2 Pet. 2:22).

In the end, while there are some good points here, there still seem to be some important unanswered questions and concerns which may warrant backing away from this approach. A fatal blow to the doctrine of eternal security this is not.

  1. Galatians 5:4b. I am using the NET Bible for these essays because of its top scholarly origin.
  2. Jonah 2:9
  3. Revelation 7:10
  4. 1 John 5:20, John 17:3
  5. Romans 6:23
  6. Romans 8:1
  7. Galatians 3:26
  8. 1 Corinthians 1:30
  9. John 15:1-2
  10. John 15:6
  11. Hebrews 10:26-27, 2 Peter 2:20, Matthew 13:20-22
  12. James 2:17
  13. Romans 8:1
  14. John 6:37
  15. Romans 12:3, 1 Timothy 1:14, Philippians 1:29
  16. Hebrews 4:9-13, 6:11-12, 10:36, 2 Timothy 2:11-13, 1 Corinthians 9:27, 2 Peter 2:15, 2 John 1:8-9, Philippians 2:14-16
  17. Mark 9:4
I'm 22. I'm married with a toddler and a newborn. love Jesus Christ. I grew up a Southern Baptist and now situate myself within Evangelical Calvinism (which isn't TULIP!). I also draw substantially from N. T. Wright, Peter Leithart, and Alastair Roberts. I go to the Baptist College of Florida. I'm also a bit nerdy.