The Nicene Nerdcast: Holy Communion vs. White Supremacy

With this post I officially begin my blog’s companion podcast, The Nicene Nerdcast. I don’t have much in the way of introduction to give you, so here’s the first installment. This is the result of some of my ponderings on race and the Church in recent days.

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The Nicene Nerdcast: Holy Communion vs. White Supremacy

Another Morning Prayer

I ran across a great new morning prayer today, and though I’d share it for the benefit of all. It opens with the Lord’s Prayer, and then goes on thus:

Almighty and everlasting God, in whom I live and move and have my being; I, Your needy creature, render You my humble praises, for Your preservation of me from the beginning of my life to this day, and especially for having delivered me from the dangers of the past night. For these Your mercies, I bless and magnify Your glorious Name; humbly beseeching You to accept this my morning sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving; for his sake who lay down in the grave, and rose again for us, Your Son our Saviour Jesus Christ.
Amen.

And since it is of Your mercy, O gracious Father, that another day is added to my life; I here dedicate both my soul and my body to You and Your service, in a sober, righteous, and godly life: in which resolution, do, O merciful God, confirm and strengthen me; that, as I grow in age, I may grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.
Amen.

But, O God, who knows the weakness and corruption of my nature, and the manifold temptations which I daily meet with; I humbly beseech You to have compassion on my infirmities, and to give me the constant assistance of Your Holy Spirit; that I may be effectually restrained from sin, and incited to my duty. Imprint upon my heart such a dread of Your judgments, and such a grateful sense of Your goodness to me, as may make me both afraid and ashamed to offend You. And, above all, keep in my mind a lively remembrance of that great day, in which I must give a strict account of my thoughts, words, and actions to him whom You have appointed the Judge of quick and dead, Your Son Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

In particular, I implore Your grace and protection for the ensuing day. Keep me temperate in all things, and diligent in my calling. Grant me patience under my afflictions. Give me grace to be just and upright in all my dealings; quiet and peaceable; full of compassion; and ready to do good to all men, according to my abilities and opportunities. Direct me in all my ways. Defend me from all dangers and adversities; and be graciously pleased to take me, and all who are dear to me, under Your fatherly care and protection. These things, and whatever else You shalt see to be necessary and convenient to me, I humbly beg, through the merits and mediation of Your Son Jesus Christ, our Lord and Saviour.
Amen.

May the grace of my Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with me and all who pray in the name of Christ, this day and evermore.
Amen.

Another Morning Prayer

Pizza Hut, Suffering, Resurrection, Fasting, and the Flesh

I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the sharing of his sufferings by becoming like him in his death, if somehow I may attain the resurrection from the dead. 

Philippians 3:10-11

Suffering and Resurrection

In my studies recently, I have come more and more to see suffering as key to the broad concept of salvation. Don’t get me wrong; right off the bat I want to point out that I don’t think suffering is some kind of requirement to be saved, or believe in something like “justification by suffering” rather than by Christ. But what I have seen is a basic order and connection being a major theme: suffering and vindication, death and resurrection.

What do I mean? Throughout Scripture, one of the ongoing realities is the suffering of God’s people at the hands of enemies, and His promise to both save them and vindicate them, prove that they were in the right, against their enemies. This can be mostly clearly seen first in the Exodus. God sees His people suffering under Egyptian oppression, declares that He is their God and they are His people, and proceeds to rescue and vindicate them. This continues to be the pattern as Israel faces many other enemies, especially those who taunt them and boast. In the Psalms there are repeated prayers for God to alleviate suffering and prove the righteousness of His people or His chosen king. This theme is also present very much in the prophets, especially Isaiah, though certainly in all the rest as well.

In between the Old and New Testaments, the theme of martyrdom in this regard grew especially strong. The Maccabean revolt etched into the Jewish worldview the importance of individuals who heroically suffered for God, even unto death, in the hope of future vindication and even resurrection. This set the context well for Jesus, who completely fulfilled this ideal of suffering and vindication in His own personal, physical death and resurrection, as the Scripture says:

He humbled Himself by becoming obedient
to the point of death —
even to death on a cross.
For this reason God highly exalted Him
and gave Him the name
that is above every name.

Philippians 2:8-9

And as well:

Therefore I will give Him the many as a portion, and He will receive the mighty as spoil, because He submitted Himself to death, and was counted among the rebels; yet He bore the sin of many and interceded for the rebels. 

Isaiah 53:12

I could produce a host of other texts, but that shouldn’t really be necessary. God has always saved His people as they patiently endure suffering, and ultimately proves them right over and against their enemies. The final climax of this is resurrection to undo the suffering and shame of death, a fate which so far only Christ has experienced in fullness.

This last part is the key. Jesus in His own self summed up the redemptive motion that God had been up to with His people since the beginning: He suffered, He died, and He rose to new life. We have been saved by Christ’s fulfillment of this dynamic between God, His people, and the world.

The significance of that for our own lives in particular is the realization of how Scripture connects these things to Christians. Just as Christ suffered, those who are in Christ are expected to suffer1. Yet this suffering is not seen as simply an isolated kind of event, a problem that will happen to us with no inherent meaning or significance. Our sufferings are directly connected to the suffering Christ experienced. His death is our death, and our sufferings are His. This means that the same end that Jesus experienced after His suffering—public vindication and physical resurrection—will also be applied to us through the Holy Spirit2.

I’ll step back and sum up the idea. We are saved through Christ’s suffering and vindication, His death and resurrection. We are united to Christ by the Holy Spirit. Therefore our sufferings as Christians assure us that we are involved in His life, His saving life, and so our story will end in the same way as His: new life and eternal glory. Moreover, our sufferings can produce fruit in us of Christ’s resurrection life here and now, not just on the last Day.

Suffering and the Flesh

I want to look at that last statement a bit more. First Peter 4:1-2 say this of suffering:

Therefore, since Christ suffered in the flesh, equip yourselves also with the same resolve — because the one who suffered in the flesh has finished with sin — in order to live the remaining time in the flesh, no longer for human desires, but for God’s will.

What does this mean? Does suffering sanctify, and if so how? Why does it say that the one who has suffered in the flesh has finished with sin? The answer to these questions, I believe, lies in a proper understanding of the “flesh.” Contra the NIV, “flesh” should not simply be taken as “sinful nature.” The flesh appears to be, Biblically speaking, a reference to the merely natural aspect of human nature and existence, the part of human life which is not truly distinguishable from animal life. The one who lives according to the flesh lets natural desires run his life: the drives for sex, food, survival, security, etc. None of these things are evil things, but when the desires for them are unchecked by anything higher than mere man, they run rampant and destroy. Yet “flesh” in this sense can also be used more neutrally. Jesus being descended from David according to the flesh merely means that David is His ancestor from a natural, physical point of view.

I think that it should not take much detailed explanation and defense to show how this makes sense of the use of “flesh” in Scripture. So if we tie that the concept of suffering for Christ, it is not difficult to see how suffering kills sins. When we share in Christ’s sufferings, we learn from experience to deny the desires of the flesh, and indeed the more you actually suffer and deny the flesh, the more you become able to do so, just as is the case with all learned behaviors. When we learn to deny the flesh by our sufferings for Christ, we find that we are more inclined to seek satisfaction in Him than to fulfill our natural desires. We become liberated from the constant compulsions to satisfy our desires for food, sex, security, and survival which so inhibit our abandoned pursuit of Christ as we continue to deny these desires in suffering for His sake.

Suffering and Fasting

This brings me to the most recent realization in conjunction with these themes. See, not all of us experience Christian suffering. Most of us do suffer at some time or another, death or sickness or poverty or broken hearts. Yet few of us suffer for Christ, voluntarily accepting suffering precisely because of our commitment to Him. Instead of by choice for God, we suffer by external factors which we try to escape or mitigate. This kind of suffering, while empathetic and in need of grace, is not the suffering that trains us to kill sin. But this is something of a blessing. We do not suffer for Christ because we have a degree of religious liberty, and are allowed to worship as we please. So we are free to pursue holiness and share the Gospel. On the other hand, we miss out on something, because God gives His people blessings through suffering3.

So what? Are we forced to miss out on these blessings as long as live in a safe place for Christians? By no means! For if indeed suffering for Christ sanctifies us by training us to deny the desires of the flesh, there is another way to experience these same benefits. This can be done by a discipline taught and practiced by Christ, used widely in the Church’s past, but mostly neglected today. What is this? Why, fasting, of course. 

See, fasting makes it possible to deny the flesh and seek Christ in a very tangible, voluntary, and powerful way. When we fast, we make a commitment that binds us for a time, pressing us to neglect our natural desires (particularly food, which is easily the most powerful) so that we might instead devote ourselves to prayer, Scripture, and love. When we do this regularly, we develop the habit, enriched and sanctified by the Spirit through these devotions, of denying self for Christ’s sake. This is, in fact, what Christ Himself did to prepare for His ministry. In order to maintain His strength, resist all distracting temptations, and train for the hardships of His ministry which would climax in death on a cross, He spent 40 entire days fasting. No food for over a month, denying His natural desires, His flesh, for the sake strengthening His resolve in the Spirit. This was the very first thing the Spirit led Him to do after His baptism, and the foundation of all He would do later. If He could actually dedicate Himself to God for 40 days without food—if He could push through that kind of intense hunger and desire—then He could withstand anything else He would need to do, even be crucified.

Following this pattern that Jesus Himself set down is exactly what we need. When we fast, we participate in Jesus’ life and death, His saving sufferings, and by this we kill the power of sin in our lives by the Holy Spirit. When we fast, we experience in part the benefits of godly, Christian suffering. Fasting is a powerful and necessary part of our spiritual disciplines by which we grow in Christ through the Spirit, alongside prayer and Scripture.

Oh, and Pizza Hut

I should add one more thought to this before I finish. See, while fasting is criminally neglected among modern church practice, it’s not altogether absent. It still does happen. Yet even when it does, I’ve noticed that it is rarely the traditional practice of abstaining from eating, or even any other basic human desire. I see people fast Facebook, sweets, sodas, Twitter, or sometimes even the entire Internet. These are useful and sometimes necessary fasts which can benefit our spiritual health. But I get the uneasy feeling from the sheer flood of these kinds of fasts that the full fasting of food has become a rarity, and that this is because in the American church we, well, have an idolatrous love of food. We are widely and deeply guilty of the sin of gluttony.

I believe this applies to most of you reading this, along with myself. We love food too much. We let it drive and control us. There’s a reason I often crave a Pizza Hut buffet, and every time I go I eat more by myself than many families get for a whole day around the world. There’s a reason that I cringe, fear, and delay when I think about fasting food. I am an idolatrous glutton, and for that I repent and impose upon myself a fast that I might learn to deny the flesh for Christ. Yet I am not alone, and I can only pray that more of us will gather the conviction to crucify our natural desires, even the desire for food, that we may be freed for holiness.

In fact, that last sentence is pretty much the whole point of this post. So with that I’ll end with a good quote:

Fasting is wonderful, because it tramples our sins like a dirty weed, while it cultivates and raises truth like a flower.

St. Basil the Great

Pizza Hut, Suffering, Resurrection, Fasting, and the Flesh

My Dog Ate My Prayerbook

If there’s one thing people are good at, it’s making excuses. I imagine we don’t even realize how many excuses we make for ourselves (and others!) in the average day.

If you’re a Christian, you probably see this most clearly and painfully in your prayer life. Well, I guess you could be one of those rare giants who prays for two hours a day in solitude plus quickly and quietly throughout your day, and if so kudos to you. But most of us are not like that. At all.

The number of excuses we use for not praying is truly impressive. We do it all the time, because we in all honesty spend a lot of time not praying when we could/should be. And the funny thing is that we don’t usually make these excuses to use on other people: we usually just tell them to ourselves!

Some of the excuses we make are downright lame and we know it. “I was just so sleepy this morning…” Really? Come on, son. “I was too busy.” Yes, those four episodes of The Waking Dead you watched on Netflix after supper were pretty urgent, weren’t they? And let’s be real, your prayers are never so long you couldn’t fit them into your 15 work break.

Some of our excuses are more sanctified, though. “I’ve messed up too bad, today, so I can’t face Him.” But that’s exactly why you need Him. “If I pray right this second, I’ll be too distracted by what’s going on for it to be any good.” Good thing your prayers depend on Jesus and not your own performance. “I can’t pray this late; I’ll fall asleep.” Where better to fall asleep then the arms of your heavenly Father?

The truth is that we know even these spiritual-sounding excuses are bunk, but we use them anyway. For whatever reason, we often put more effort into not praying than we would ever exert by praying. It’s wrong, though. We need to pray. Somewhere in our hearts as believers we do even want to pray.

So what do we do? What do I do as the worst offender? Well, the first step to solving a problem is to recognize it, so let’s call ourselves out. When you excuse yourself from praying, give yourself the look the teacher gives the “my dog ate my homework” kid. If necessary, get someone else to help hold you accountable so they can give you that look for your lane excuses. And above all, let’s position ourselves within God’s people, doing God’s work, so that we will be driven to pray. Amen.

My Dog Ate My Prayerbook